Spreading the Word on EDI: Interest in Electronic Data Interchange Grows as NAA Develops Formats, Guidelines; Groups Pursue Pilot Projects

By Rosenberg, Jim | Editor & Publisher, July 25, 1992 | Go to article overview

Spreading the Word on EDI: Interest in Electronic Data Interchange Grows as NAA Develops Formats, Guidelines; Groups Pursue Pilot Projects


Rosenberg, Jim, Editor & Publisher


The goal of electronic interchange of ad data is to "make newspapers easier for advertisers to deal with," said John Iobst, director of advanced computer science at the Newspaper Association of America.

The NAA is working to create its own industry-specific version of the electronic data interchange standard (EDI), which amounts to a "consistent interface between machines," using proprietary internal formats only when going into and coming out of the interchange. All systems, therefore, will be able to communicate in a universally recognizable format while preserving their familiar formats for in-house use.

Addressing an overflow crowd of about 300 at the June ANPA/TEC in Atlanta, Iobst led a workshop panel on EDI at newspapers. Iobst defined the simple idea that depends on a complex set of details as "a convention prescribing a standard syntax for transmission of commercial data between computers of trading partners ."

It means that regardless of parties' communications systems, computers or application software, the outcome of all computer transmissions (even hand delivery or fax) will be specific information presented in a common format.

At an ANPA-sponsored conference in February, David G.B. Lindsay, vice president of the Apalachicola (Fla.) Times and former chairman of ANPA's EDI task force, said the standard removes nonproductive costs from newspaper advertising.

He listed several benefits of standardized data exchange. EDI can handle complex indirect transactions carried out through an advertiser's agency and a paper's rep firm. It will help realize the idea of one-order, one-bill. All parties gain a competitive edge because a newspaper buy becomes easier, the process is faster and the work less, operator errors and miscommunications are fewer, media planning can be faster, and local customization is possible.

More generally, an advertiser will be able to deal with all newspapers in the same manner, knowing that each newspaper will understand each communication or quickly inform an advertiser that it does not. Newspapers, however, may have to alter their procedures and modify their systems to properly work with the information needed to exploit EDI.

EDI documents will supply all identification (groups, businesses, departments, persons, places) and commercial data (rates, dates and placement) already required in oral and written transactions and will do so in much the same sequence. It will also be able to take into account different products from the same publishing company (e.g., daily editions, special sections, Sunday magazines, tv program booklets or TMC products.)

Though EDI covers advertising for newspapers, it could also serve their communications with suppliers. It is, however, very broad and already in use by manufacturers, retailers, insurers and the U.S. government-which Iobst identified as a latecomer to EDI but an important player in achieving its widespread use.

U.S. and international standards are expected to merge in several years, according to Lindsay. The EMBARC system used by papermakers is a similar process that is expected to become a part of EDI, he said.

Because many countries now use the conventions embodied in the X12 format in the United States, NAA works within that public format. It was originated by the banking industry and adopted for business communications by the American National Standards Institute.

Almost two inches thick, the volume that specifies EDI reflects the detail required to standardize data exchange. (An electronic copy of the standard is available, but EDI products vendors and users may not use it commercially.) Iobst said that, when complete, the newspaper-specific version of EDI will be twice the length of the general EDI standard. The version is being compiled in the NAA's "Newspapers and Advertising Conventions and Implementation Guidelines."

Joining the former American Newspaper Publishers Association in developing a newspaper advertising subset for EDI were the marketing and financial fraternal organizations that are now merged into the NAA, as well as vendors, advertisers, individual newspapers and newspaper groups, two of which are involved in EDI pilot projects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Spreading the Word on EDI: Interest in Electronic Data Interchange Grows as NAA Develops Formats, Guidelines; Groups Pursue Pilot Projects
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.