Vitamin Industry defendsE Usage; Disputes Link to Early Death

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

Vitamin Industry defendsE Usage; Disputes Link to Early Death


Byline: Tom Ramstack, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The vitamin industry is trying to control the damage to its sales of vitamin E after research reported last month linked the supplement to early death.

People who take daily doses of 400 international units or higher are about 10 percent more likely to die prematurely than people who take smaller doses or no vitamin E supplements, researchers from Johns Hopkins University reported Nov. 10 at an American Heart Association conference in New Orleans.

About a quarter of the U.S. population takes vitamin E supplements, according to industry estimates.

This week, the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a dietary supplement trade association, ran ads in major newspapers to counter the study's findings.

"Numerous clinical studies support vitamin E's role in cardiovascular health, immune function and antioxidant protection," the ads said.

They also said the study that found health risks from vitamin E was flawed because it looked primarily at an elderly population with pre-existing health problems.

Nevertheless, vitamin retailers have said their vitamin E business is damaged.

"The study has had a negative impact on vitamin E sales across the industry, which we believe is very unfortunate given the multiple potential benefits of vitamin E," said Patrick Fitzgerald, spokesman for General Nutrition Centers, a national retailer of nutritional supplements.

He mentioned reduced risk of cancer and age-related vision loss as examples.

"It's just not scientifically valid, but it's certainly going to hurt sales," Harvey Kamil, president of nutritional supplement company NBTY Inc. said about the Johns Hopkins study.

Customers at vitamin stores in the Washington area have been expressing concern about the supplement, according to sales personnel.

A clerk at a Vitamin Shoppe store in Gaithersburg, who asked that her name be withheld, said sales of vitamin E were "not very good because of the report that came out."

Jason Kam, vice president of business development for Purity Products, a nutritional supplement maker, said the Johns Hopkins study alone was not enough to override previous research that showed benefits from vitamin E. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vitamin Industry defendsE Usage; Disputes Link to Early Death
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.