WEB WATCH: Understanding the Human Genome Project

By Grubka, Sharon; Jacobs, Heather | Phi Delta Kappan, December 2004 | Go to article overview

WEB WATCH: Understanding the Human Genome Project


Grubka, Sharon, Jacobs, Heather, Phi Delta Kappan


THROUGH the study of the Human Genome Project, educators and students can explore the frontiers of genetic science and speculate about its impact on the future of modern medicine. The following websites will help readers gain a greater understanding of this profound scientific advance.

www.ornl.gov/hgmis/education/education.html

The Office of Science and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the U.S. Department of Energy host a site featuring a plethora of educational resources on genetic science. The topics range from a basic overview of the field to the ethical, legal, and social issues involved.

www.genome.gov/education

The National Human Genome Institute provides access to a variety of resources and programs designed to heighten public awareness of genetic research. This comprehensive educational site features online kits with downloadable modules and multimedia videos focusing on the history, implications, and terminology of genetic science.

www.accessexcellence.org/AE

The Access Excellence website offers teaching strategies and online activities that define current concepts in science and engage students in inquiry-based learning. This site features an informative collection of linked resources to extend the understanding of biotechnology.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/jan-jun00/genome.html

NewsHour Extra online defines the basic terms related to the human genome in simple language. Additional links to related sites are highlighted as well.

www.amnh.org/exhibitions/genomics

The American Museum of Natural History sponsors the website the Genomic Revolution, which investigates the history of human genetics and the 0.1% of human genetic identity that makes us different from one another.

www.er.doe.gov/production/ober/genome.html

The Department of Energy hosts a site that introduces the Human Genome Project, covers a number of research topics, and offers educational links for users of any age.

http://hshgp.genome.washington.edu

The High School Human Genome Program site guides the professional development of high school teachers on the subject of DNA and provides information on workshops for teachers in the Seattle area. In addition, the site provides links to related sites and offers information about giving students opportunities to conduct DNA-based research. …

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WEB WATCH: Understanding the Human Genome Project
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