The Fight Goes On

By Corn, David | The Nation, December 6, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Fight Goes On


Corn, David, The Nation


From a permanent campaign to a permanent election? Bloggers, e-voting foes and concerned citizens keep raising questions and hurling charges about the November 2 voting and vote-counting, especially in the fulcrum state of Ohio. And it seems there may be a recount in the Buckeye State, prompted by a request submitted by two minor presidential candidates, David Cobb of the Green Party and Michael Badnarik of the Libertarian Party. That recount will not proceed until the vote is certified by the Secretary of State, Kenneth Blackwell, a conservative who co-chaired the Bush campaign in Ohio. Cobb and Badnarik have reasonably asked Blackwell to recuse himself.

In the swirl of Internet-fueled allegations, assorted issues have emerged and merged: odd voting patterns, suspicious election day activity, voter suppression, "spoiled" ballots and the susceptibility of e-voting machines to errors or, worse, hacking. A recount in Ohio will not address all the problems, real or imagined. It cannot tally votes not cast due to suppression efforts; it cannot include ballots not properly cast. At a recent forum in Columbus, voters complained about long lines, undertrained poll workers and too few, or broken, voting machines--mostly in urban and minority neighborhoods. Was there an organized GOP effort to tamp down the vote in Kerry strongholds? Probably. There is evidence that suppression shenanigans were mounted in Ohio and elsewhere. But the Democrats have done a poor job of chronicling, publicizing and criticizing such GOP chicanery. And while in Ohio there were 93,000 "spoiled" ballots that did not register a vote and 155,000 provisional ballots, a recount that includes those ballots is highly unlikely to erase Bush's lead of 136,000 votes. (Based on my experience examining "spoiled" ballots in Florida, I'd estimate a Kerry pickup of less than 1,000 votes with those ballots.) Moreover, a recount might not uncover problems--intentional or accidental--with electronic voting. "The figures in cooked books often look perfectly fine; so would a cooked vote tally" that used e-voting machines with no paper trail, notes the Electronic Frontier Foundation. "In this election, we are forced to take it on faith that our votes were recorded in the way that we intended." And there are numerous accounts of Kerry voters in Florida who claimed their touch-screen machines initially indicated they had voted for Bush. …

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