Police Charge Husband over Wife's Murder; No Body Found, but Detectives Believe Woman Is Dead

Daily Mail (London), December 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

Police Charge Husband over Wife's Murder; No Body Found, but Detectives Believe Woman Is Dead


Byline: DAWN THOMPSON

THE husband of a missing mother-of-two was yesterday charged in connection with her murder.

Legal secretary Margaret Gardiner vanished hours after allegedly telling colleagues her marriage was in difficulties.

She was expected back at work after going home at lunchtime on October 4, but never returned.

She was later thought to have caught a train to visit her children in England - but the 55-year-old never arrived.

Yesterday, officers said that although they had not found a body they could confirm after extensive searches that Mrs Gardiner was dead.

Police would not elaborate on why they are convinced Mrs Gardiner, of Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire, is no longer alive but said their conclusion was based on forensic analysis.

Police were yesterday understood to be questioning Gardiner, 57, about the death of his wife of 33 years.

Detective Chief Inspector John Riggans said: 'A 57-year-old man has been arrested and is in police custody in connection with Mrs Gardiner's death. A report is being submitted to the procurator fiscal.

' The investigation into the disappearance and subsequent death of Mrs Gardiner will continue. As yet her body has not been found.' Her husband is expected to appear at Dumbarton Sheriff Court on Monday.

Mrs Gardiner's parents Donald, 86, and Nettie Lowrie, 78, of Pollok, Glasgow, have been informed of the arrest. The couple said last month their daughter's disappearance was destroying their health. …

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Police Charge Husband over Wife's Murder; No Body Found, but Detectives Believe Woman Is Dead
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