A Win-Win for Pharmaceuticals

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

A Win-Win for Pharmaceuticals


Byline: Allan H. Conney, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Advertisements for prescription drugs bombard us daily - in magazines, newspapers and on television.

These persuasive direct-to-consumer ads compete for our attention and our dollars, but do they better inform the audience or improve medical care and public health? Captivated by the latest news concerning Vioxx, Celebrex and nonprescription Aleve, Americans are now debating this question in the harsh light of reality.

The pharmaceutical industry spends about $3 billion yearly advertising to people who may not be able to judge the effectiveness or desirability of one drug over another. The American Medical Association published a study this year criticizing the pharmaceutical ads for their lack of information on cost, alternative treatment options and adverse effects.

The World Health Organization has said these ads may represent a conflict of interest between business goals and the rational use of drugs by the public. In Europe, advertising prescription drugs directly to consumers is prohibited; perhaps it is time we seriously consider such action here.

Excesses in U.S. pharmaceutical advertising now fuel the controversy over high drug prices and heighten concerns about newly revealed, potentially lethal drug side-effects. This obscures the industry's history of developing new treatments and miraculous cures for a host of diseases and disorders.

The pharmaceutical industry defends its advertising, contending it is educational and encourages consumers to take part in managing their health care. I suggest public education on pharmaceuticals could be better handled by an independent group with no vested interest in increasing sales.

Pharmacy schools and medical schools nationwide are a source of qualified scientists and practitioners with expertise and knowledge in drug therapy, drug toxicity and cost-benefit analysis.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Win-Win for Pharmaceuticals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.