To the End of the World: A Journey to Ushuaia, Argentina

By Adams, Michael Andre | Black Enterprise, January 2005 | Go to article overview

To the End of the World: A Journey to Ushuaia, Argentina


Adams, Michael Andre, Black Enterprise


The adventure begins in the rural town of El Calafate, where palatial glaciers and icebergs in Argentina's Patagonian region rise to unimaginable heights and glisten like blue diamonds. It's an ice show unlike any other.

As enormous chunks of the ice formation break apart and crash into the sea, its impact reverberates for miles. For a more intimate encounter, don a pair of cleats and travel along the Perito Moreno Glacier or explore the Walichu Caves, where you will find paintings attributed to the aborigines of the Paleolithic age.

The climate is surprisingly dry with a high temperature of 50 degrees and a low of 28 during the winter. The combination of brisk weather and glacier hikes can stir a voracious appetite, and Argentina is a country of culinary delights. It's no secret that Argentineans are beefeaters. The asado (barbecue), is a favorite dining occasion at the open-air grill restaurants called parrillas. There you'll find a mix of prime ribs, pork, chicken, sweetbreads, and kidneys--sometimes all on the same plate. Wash it all down with a swig of mate, a warm tea mixed of various leaves and herbs. Or choose a Malbec, considered the best red wine from Argentina. Torrontes is a favorite dry white.

While there are several languages spoken throughout Argentina, Spanish is the official languge and English is widely spoken. Tehuelche, the native tongue of the Patagonian region, is nearly extinct.

Next stop, Ushuaia, the southernmost city on the map. It is affectionately known as "the end of the world." It is also the gateway to Antarctica. …

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