Lucio Tan Pleads Not Guilty to P5.6-B Tax Evasion Cases

Manila Bulletin, January 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

Lucio Tan Pleads Not Guilty to P5.6-B Tax Evasion Cases


Byline: TERESA CEROJANO

MANILA, Philippines (AP) - Philippine tobacco tycoon Lucio Tan, one of the richest men in the world, pleaded not guilty Friday to charges that he used dummy firms to evade paying more than R25 billion ($445 million; euro 338 million) in taxes.

Tan entered the plea before the suburban Marikina City Metropolitan Trial Court, which earlier had dismissed the nine counts of tax evasion against him and 52 others but reopened the case last year following a Supreme Court ruling.

According to the charges, Tans Fortune Tobacco Corp. evaded paying the taxes from 1990 to 1992, court officials said.

Tan, 70, chairman of Philippine Airlines, is one of the countrys richest men, with interests in banking, beer and tobacco. Forbes magazine lists him among the worlds billionaires, with assets of up to $1.5 billion (euro 1.14 billion) as of last February.

The revenue bureau originally charged Tan with tax evasion in 1993 during the administration of former President Fidel Ramos.

But that case did not proceed because Tan, in a series of appeals that reached the Supreme Court, managed to get the charges suspended pending an investigation by the Justice Department.

Tan claimed the cases were brought against him for not supporting Ramos 1992 candidacy.

Tan was also closely identified with late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, and was accused of acting as a front for several companies the government believes were owned by Marcos.

After Marcos 1986 ouster, Tan kept a low profile under the succeeding administrations of Corazon Aquino and Ramos, who actively pursued the tax charges against him.

Tan was a supporter of former President Joseph Estrada, who succeeded Ramos in 1998 and was ousted on corruption charges in 2001.

Philippines richest man Lucio Tan pleads not guilty to tax evasion

MANILA (AFP) Lucio Tan, the Philippines wealthiest man, on Friday pleaded not guilty of failing to pay taxes of some $455 million, court officials said.

The 69-year-old tycoon, clad in formal white Filipino shirt, appeared at a lower court in eastern Manila together with other executives of his Fortune Tobacco Corp. to answer charges that the firm evaded taxes totalling R25.6 billion ($455 million) between 1990 and 1992.

"He pleaded not guilty," a court official told AFP. The other defendants made the same pleas.

Tan lawyer Estelito Mendoza said his client welcomed the filing of the charges so he could prove his innocence.

"We even asked the court for a two days per week trial but the court did not agree because of its heavy schedule," Mendoza told reporters.

Metropolitan trial court judge Alex Ruiz set once-a-week hearings every Friday from Feb. 18.

The government has been prosecuting the case since 1993 but has so far failed to win a conviction.

The case was filed at the court in 1998 but it was dismissed the following year. The government later brought the case to a regional trial court, which also dismissed it.

However, the Supreme Court overturned the lower court rulings last year and ordered a retrial.

The US magazine Forbes lists Tan, an immigrant from eastern China, as the worlds 377th richest man with a fortune of about $1.5 billion.

Aside from Fortune Tobacco, Tan also controls the national carriers Philippine Airlines and Air Philippines, Asia Brewery and the Allied Bank, among others.

Lucio Tan, execs plead not guilty to multi-billion tax evasion raps

Tobacco magnate Lucio Tan and his co-accused in the multi-billion peso tax evasion cases pleaded not guilty in yesterdays arraignment before the Marikina City Metropolitan Trial Court Branch 75 presided by Judge Alex Ruiz.

Aside from Tan, founder and chairman of Fortune Tobacco Corp., 70 other executives and officers of the FTC and eight marketing corporations were charged with nine cases of tax evasion amounting to R25 billion in unpaid taxes that have accrued over the past decade. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lucio Tan Pleads Not Guilty to P5.6-B Tax Evasion Cases
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.