Indictment of TV News

Editor & Publisher, July 18, 1992 | Go to article overview

Indictment of TV News


The latest survey of "The People, the Press & Politics," conducted by Times Mirror, contains a strong indictment of television news as an informative news medium.

Two years ago, the 1990 Times Mirror study of generational differences in news attentiveness and media use "concluded that the |new generation gap' was not one of politics or values, but one of information and attentiveness. The results of Times Mirror's News Interest Index surveys when contrasted with the findings of historical opinion polls found that people under 30 represented a |generation that knows less, and cares less' about what's going on in the larger world than previous generations of young people."

When asked about their sources of election news, almost all Americans say they are turning to television (84%), half say they are relying on newspapers, one in five mentions radio, and fewer than one in 10 mention magazines. Looked at another way, the survey shows "the public divides about evenly between those who are relying exclusively on television for news about the campaign (40%), versus those who are relying on both media (43%) or on newspapers only (12%).

"A majority of people under 35 rely solely on tv for campaign news...

"Times Mirror surveys have consistently shown that people who rely on television only for campaign news know less about the campaign than people who use newspapers to follow the election. In the current poll this is illustrated by the finding that only 25% of "tv exclusives" know that the Democrats control Congress, while 45% who read newspapers do. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Indictment of TV News
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.