People of Vision

By Zore, Ed | Executive Speeches, October-November 2004 | Go to article overview

People of Vision


Zore, Ed, Executive Speeches


I'll start off this morning with a story. No, it's not about a dog ... It's not about a chainsaw ... You've heard all those before. This story is about the last conversation I had with one of my best friends from high school.

Russ and I were both about 20 at the time. I was in college ... and he was just back from a stint in Viet Nam. I had just given him a ride in my brand new car ... a 1965 Chevy Super Sport ... and we were sitting in front of his house ... talking about our futures ... philosophizing ... and arguing.

I was pushing him to go to college.

You see ... I always admired his abilities. In my mind, Russ was smarter and more talented than I was. And ... as I later found out ... he felt the same about me. He had great abilities ... and I wanted him to take advantage of his gifts. I thought he should use his talents ... make a plan ... study something he loved ... get a degree.

Russ fought the idea.

He said, "Ed, college might be right for you ... but it's just not right for me." Instead, he told me he'd rather just go out and get as good a job as he could. But I knew he'd probably just drift.

It was sad ... because that was the last time I ever talked with my friend in a meaningful way. We weren't angry with each other ... But from the moment that conversation ended, our friendship was never the same. We had less and less in common ... And just parted ways.

I'm not sure I understood it then ... but over the years, I've thought a lot about that conversation ... and now it's clear. Russ just couldn't see his potential ... He couldn't see what his life might become ... He didn't see where he could go if he put some thought and work into it ... He didn't know what he wanted out of life ... And he didn't have a vision or a plan for himself.

Maybe I was fortunate ... but I always had that kind of vision. I could see how I could get to a better place in life. And I always felt I understood the path I needed to follow to get there. I found out early in life that things don't just happen:

      I had to make things happen for myself ...

      I needed to understand what I was good at ... and
   what I wasn't good at (Which by the way, is a
   long list) ...

      I needed to visualize where my talents could
   take me ...

      I needed to create a plan to get there ...

      And then ... I needed to work hard ... and never
   stop believing in myself ... to make that vision
   real.

I'm sharing this memory, because in many ways, this could just as well be a story about your sense of vision ... and the vision that "defines the difference" you make in people's lives.

Think about it--When your clients and policyowners seem to be drifting ... you give them direction:

      When they can't see their potential or even their
   need for financial security ... you help them discover
   what they can achieve ...

      When they don't have a plan ... you help them
   create it ...

      And when they can't find the path ... you help
   them carve one out ...

      Then, you stand by them ... and you never let
   them stop believing in what they can accomplish.

      Along the way, you counsel them ... you prod
   them ...

      And I'll bet you even argue a bit ...

But that's okay ... Because in the end, you protect your clients ... make them think ... and help them create a vision for their businesses, their families and their futures.

You show your clients that financial security won't just happen ... It has to be planned for ... and nurtured ... And you show them that they have to make it happen.

Not long ago, a few of our board members asked me an interesting question.

"Ed, just what do you worry about?"

I told them I don't spend a lot of time worrying. (It's not real productive.) As you might have noticed, I'm confident . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

People of Vision
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.