An Expert Reveals Her Beauty Tips; Anti-Ageing Special

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), January 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

An Expert Reveals Her Beauty Tips; Anti-Ageing Special


Byline: BARBARA GOULDEN

DO you dream of beautiful, clear skin and spend a fortune on lotions and potions to ensure those wrinkles are kept at bay?

While the latest anti-ageing creams might make us feel better, do we really need to fork out so much money to stay looking youthful? And should our beauty routine change as we get older?

We asked a skin expert to reveal the secret of younger-looking skin. BARBARA GOULDEN reports.

BANISH soap, treat your face like the finest bone china, and it will serve you well in later life, says beauty therapy lecturer Jacqui Crane.

Not only has Jacqui trained thousands of young students at what is now City College, Coventry, but at her home in Kenilworth, she's also been encouraging her own teenage daughter, Lauren, to follow a cleansing, toning and moisturising regime since the age of 12.

"Once past the age of 10, I think most soaps are too drying for the face," explains Jacqui, whose own 37-year-old skin is probably the best advertisement for her words.

The "bone china" treatment can be summed up in not subjecting yourself to extremes of temperature without proper protection.

Hence, all foundation creams should contain sunscreen protection - and older women particularly are just looking for broken red veins if they plunge from central-heated warmth to freezing ice and snow without plenty of moisturiser.

Nor do steam and sauna rooms suit the more sensitive skins. And these days everybody knows the dangers of too much exposure to the the sun.

On the subject of botox and collagen treatments, Jacqui is wary.

"It's up to each individual to make an informed choice. But remember you are having a poisonous toxin injected into your body.

"In future I might consider one of the new collagen treatments which are still being developed but I wouldn't have botox because I don't think it's been around long enough to allow enough research.

"As a beauty therapist I am more in line with nature - prevention is better than cure. If you begin to look after your skin from a very early age then your skin will look after you."

That's why sunscreen is so important. We already know children should wear factor 15 or 20 whenever they're playing outside - and babies need even higher protection.

And yes, Jacqui does come across women with fantastic skin who boast how they've never washed with anything except soap and water all their lives.

"They're just lucky," she sighs.

In Kenilworth, her 14-year-old daughter Lauren is not taking any chances, especially after recently discovering the first sprinkling of spots on her forehead.

Lauren, who would like to go on to university and become a lawyer, said: "I cleanse, tone and moisturise twice a day and use an exfoliating cream to clear dead skin cells once a week.

"I don't usually get spots - these might be because I've had a fringe cut. But mum advises me not to use any of the medicated face washes - just a different sort of moisturiser."

Back at City College, Della Bingley, head of the hair and beauty department, takes a softer line on botox because she believes the psychological aspects of women feeling and looking good combine to offer a better outlook on life.

At the age of 54, Della is also slightly more aware of the onset of middle age.

She says: "Botox can look too much like a mask if it isn't done well - it all depends on whose putting in the injections.

"Personally, I prefer the facelift without surgery techniques that our second-year students are learning at the college and many beauty salons now offer.

"A course of these can be really effective and then they just need a maintenance visit once a month.

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