Attacks by Islamists Projected to Continue; Report Says Biological Weapons Use Likely

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 14, 2005 | Go to article overview

Attacks by Islamists Projected to Continue; Report Says Biological Weapons Use Likely


Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Radical Islamic terrorists will continue to attack the United States and the world in the coming two decades and are likely to obtain and use biological weapons, according to a new intelligence report made public yesterday.

The National Intelligence Council (NIC) report, based on more than 1,000 interviews with U.S. and foreign specialists, said extremist Muslims pose the greatest danger of terror attack because their "religious zeal" has pushed them to conduct mass casualty attacks.

"The most worrisome trend has been an intensified search by some terrorist groups to obtain weapons of mass destruction," the report said. "Our greatest concern is that these groups might acquire biological agents or less likely, a nuclear device, either of which could cause mass casualties."

The report, "Mapping the Global Future," projects future threats and trends to 2020, and concludes that globalization is creating a new era of world insecurity.

"Our starting point is that we are facing a more fluid and complicated set of international alignments than any we have seen since the creation of the Western alliance system in 1949," said Robert Hutchings, NIC chairman.

The NIC is a group of forecasting intelligence analysts under CIA Director Porter J. Goss. It is not formally part of the CIA.

Mr. Hutchings told reporters at CIA headquarters that the risk of global conflict among states is low, although Islamic terrorism and the rise of China pose new challenges for the future.

The main worry is that smaller and better informed terrorist groups will resort to the use of biological weapons, the report said.

"Indeed, the bioterrorist's laboratory could well be the size of a household kitchen, and the weapon built there could be smaller than a toaster," the report said. "Terrorist use of biological agents is therefore likely, and the range of options will grow. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Attacks by Islamists Projected to Continue; Report Says Biological Weapons Use Likely
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.