Democrats Use Rice Nomination to Measure Iraq; Boxer Takes Opportunity to Raise Funds for Campaign Committee

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 26, 2005 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Democrats Use Rice Nomination to Measure Iraq; Boxer Takes Opportunity to Raise Funds for Campaign Committee


Byline: Stephen Dinan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Condoleezza Rice is all but assured of Senate confirmation as secretary of state today, but Democrats used yesterday's debate over her nomination to make her a surrogate for President Bush's Iraq policy, and even began using her as a target in a new fund-raising campaign.

The Senate's two longest-serving Democrats, Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts, led a group of party members announcing that they will oppose her nomination as a way of rejecting Mr. Bush's prosecution of the war on terror.

"Dr. Rice was a key member of the national security team that developed and justified the rationale for war, and it's been a catastrophic failure, a continuing quagmire," Mr. Kennedy said. "In these circumstances, she should not be promoted to secretary of state."

In addition to the debate on the floor of the Senate, Sen. Barbara Boxer, the California Democrat who was the most pointed interrogator of Miss Rice at her hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee last week, wrote a fund-raising e-mail about Miss Rice for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

"I will continue to make my voice heard on the Senate Foreign Relations committee, but in order to put the brakes on four more years of misdirection in Iraq and reckless policies at home, we need to elect more Democrats to the Senate during the 2006 midterm elections," Mrs. Boxer said in her plea for money.

Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican, said Miss Rice deserves an apology for the letter, which he said "does offend the American people." Republicans said the letter exposed Democrats' arguments as pure politics.

"It cheapens her arguments on the floor," said Bob Stevenson, spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Tennessee Republican. "It suggests that her opposition to the nomination is motivated by partisan politics rather than reason. This should be about who is going to serve our nation as secretary of state, not red state, blue state."

Mrs. Boxer's letter was a surprise to some of her fellow Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, who said he didn't know about it.

"I'd have to see the letter to see how it's used," he told reporters yesterday afternoon.

Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Byrd were joined by about a half-dozen other Democrats who spoke against Miss Rice.

"She misled me about the situation in Iraq," Sen.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Democrats Use Rice Nomination to Measure Iraq; Boxer Takes Opportunity to Raise Funds for Campaign Committee
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.