X-Ray Radiation, Viruses Identified as Cancer Agents; HHS Report Adds 17 Risk Factors

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

X-Ray Radiation, Viruses Identified as Cancer Agents; HHS Report Adds 17 Risk Factors


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Several viruses - including some sexually transmitted - and radiation from X-rays have been added to the Department of Health and Human Services' growing list of cancer-causing agents.

Hepatitis B and C viruses, and some human papillomaviruses (HPV), were among the 17 substances added to a list of 229 cancer-causing agents, according to the 11th edition of the Report on Carcinogens released yesterday.

Dr. Joe S. McIlhaney, president of the Medical Institute for Sexual Health in Austin, Texas, said it was "extremely significant" that HPV and hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) have been identified as "known" carcinogens.

"This brings science into the whole area of prevention," he said, given that HPVs are sexually transmitted, as are most cases of HBV. The major risk factor for HCV infection is illegal intravenous drug use, the federal report states.

Dr. McIlhaney said 18 strains of HPVs are responsible for about 99 percent of all cervical cancer cases. The report points out that HCV is the "leading cause of liver cancer in the United States," and that "chronic HBV infections" also cause liver cancer.

As for the cancer-causing viruses identified in the report, Dr. McIlhaney says, it is important for those sexually active to know that condoms do not reduce the risk of HPV transmission. The report says about 20 million Americans are infected with genital HPVs, and 5.5 million new infections occur yearly. Most people infected do not have symptoms.

About 1 million Americans are infected chronically with HBV, and more than 3 million are infected with HCV. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

X-Ray Radiation, Viruses Identified as Cancer Agents; HHS Report Adds 17 Risk Factors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.