Powerhouse for Change

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Powerhouse for Change


Byline: Donald Lambro, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

George W. Bush began campaigning for his second-term agenda this week with three huge victories behind him: a clear vote of confidence in his presidency and his party, a recovered economy and a big setback for terrorists in Iraq.

One in three would have been enough for any presidency to crow about, but all three coming together at the start of a new term makes for a heady political brew that will surely strengthen Mr. Bush's hand in the many domestic and foreign policy battles to come.

His re-election alone by a decisive vote margin, plus the net gains by Republicans in Congress, a rare political event in a second-term presidency, would have made him a potent political force on Capitol Hill. Add a tax cut-fueled economy that grew by more than 4 percent last year, surpassing all expectations, and Mr. Bush becomes even stronger.

The only remaining doubts about his presidency were in Iraq, where the forces of freedom and self-government were pitted against the tyranny of terrorism. Those forces clashed on the political battlefield Sunday and the terrorists lost, big time, as Mr. Bush believed and predicted they would.

It was not only a breathtaking national security-foreign policy victory for Mr. Bush, whose Iraq policies were bitterly criticized by Democratic foes, but also for his belief the aroused forces of freedom can face down and ultimately defeat terrorism.

The inspiring sight of millions of Iraqis trooping to the polls to vote for sovereignty, self-government and freedom, in the face of terrorist threats of beheadings and "bathing the streets in blood," was also a victory for U.S. military forces and the small but determined allied coalition that freed Iraq and put its brave people on the terror-strewn path to Sunday's historic elections.

All these disparate political forces came together this week at just the right time as Mr. Bush prepared his seminal State of the Union address to Congress and kick off one of the most ambitious, far-reaching reform agenda since the New Deal.

If being newly re-elected, with a resurgent economy, had already made George Bush political powerhouse in the legislative battles to come, his success as a wartime leader planting the seeds of democracy in the Middle East's terrorist-breeding grounds elevates his presidency and his political influence to an even higher power, both at home and abroad.

Thus, the prospects have improved dramatically for enacting some version of his personal Social Security investment accounts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Powerhouse for Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.