Job Corps Students Shadow Lawmakers

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Job Corps Students Shadow Lawmakers


Byline: Melissa Brosk, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

More than 30 Job Corps students from across the country spent yesterday on Capitol Hill, shadowing members of Congress as part of the program's 40th anniversary celebration.

Latoya Logan, a 24-year-old student at the Potomac Job Corps Center in Southwest, shadowed Sen. Lamar Alexander, Tennessee Republican.

"I'm very excited," Miss Logan said. "I grew up in Memphis, so I like him."

Miss Logan was given a tour of Mr. Alexander's office before meeting privately with him and key members of his staff.

In return, Miss Logan gave Mr. Alexander a Job Corps T-shirt and hat, which he promised to wear when fishing.

"When I was 17, a U.S. congressman paid attention to me," Mr. Alexander said. "It reminds me that I shouldn't be too busy for young people."

Miss Logan said she enrolled in the job-training program for at-risk youths after seeing a television commercial for the program. She attended Job Corps classes in Kentucky before moving to the District for an advanced clerical program.

"I'm learning word processing, data entry and typing," she said. "I'd like to go into the health care field as an administrative assistant when I graduate."

Most students complete their training in nine months, but are allowed two years to get through their choice of more than 100 vocational training programs.

The federally funded program was founded in 1964 by Sargent Shriver as an education and job-training program for people 16 to 24. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Job Corps Students Shadow Lawmakers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.