Fireworks Andmusic from Hell; POP

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

Fireworks Andmusic from Hell; POP


Byline: DAVID SMYTH

Rammstein

Brixton Academy

GERMAN pyromaniacs Rammstein play three nights at Brixton Academy this week, just like chart-topping bands such as Franz Ferdinand and Keane. That's almost 15,000 Londoners, yet they are far from household names, at least in any household where you or I would care to pop for tea.

Who are they, and why do so many people want to see them? Six men from east Germany who have produced four albums of bludgeoning industrial metal, who put on the kind of show that makes doyennes of the arena spectacular such as Kylie and Madonna look as if they aren't really trying.

They appeared, just after a set of smartly dressed roadies wielding metal baseball bats, atop a platform high above the stage, beneath which was a mess of pipes and screens designed to look like a criminal mastermind's lair.

Guitarists Paul Landers and Richard Kruspe-Bernstein were lowered to eye level on motorised platforms while muscular singer Till Lindemann, poured into a leather corset, intoned Reise, Reise in his doom-laden growl. …

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