Rail Ticket Booking Fiasco; Passengers Cannot Reserve Seats until Two Weeks before Journey

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

Rail Ticket Booking Fiasco; Passengers Cannot Reserve Seats until Two Weeks before Journey


Byline: ANDRE PAINE

A ROW broke out today over a ticket booking fiasco on the railways.

Passengers are unable to buy tickets for some trains due to travel only a fortnight later because of a breakdown of the reservations system.

Train companies claim the problems are the fault of Network Rail, the engineering company in charge of repairs on the line. They say they are unable to sell tickets very far in advance because Network Rail is not giving enough notice of when lines are going to be closed.

But Network Rail hit back by insisting operators were not sending their revised timetables through quickly enough.

Passenger watchdogs slammed the failure of the system. A spokesman for the Rail Passengers' Council said: "We have asked the rail regulator to sort this out, because Network Rail and the train companies are just blaming each other. It is not good enough - passengers are the ones that are suffering."

The Evening Standard put five routes to the test and discovered that bookings beyond a few weeks away were difficult to secure.

First Great Western was unable to confirm sales for weekend rail services from London to Cardiff beyond 13 February.

Virgin West Coast admits passengers will have to pay more as it cannot guarantee bookings for journeys two weeks in advance.

GNER could not confirm bookings yet for weekend journeys to Edinburgh next month.

A spokeswoman for the Association of Train Operating Companies said: " Network Rail is obligated to provide 12 weeks notice of engineering work, but they are not coming up with that full information to train operating companies and this has been an issue for quite some time."

A spokesman for Network Rail insisted action was being taken and said the current horizon for advance booking averages four weeks across the network.

He said: "There is more engineering work than ever before and more trains running on a smaller network, so putting together a timetable is more complicated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rail Ticket Booking Fiasco; Passengers Cannot Reserve Seats until Two Weeks before Journey
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.