JPC and the Black World: Company's Magazines Championed Freedom of Blacks at Home and Abroad

Ebony, November 1992 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

JPC and the Black World: Company's Magazines Championed Freedom of Blacks at Home and Abroad


Fifty years ago, at the outset of Johnson Publishing Co., the only independent Black nations in Africa were Ethiopia and Liberia. The rest of the continent was teeming with millions struggling against their colonial masters and yearning to be free. The fledgling companys magazines wasted no time in joining that freedom struggle by chipping away at the stereotypical view of Africans and West Indians whom a racist White press had relegated to "Third World" status and characterized as childlike, primitive and incapable of self-rule. Today, with political freedom a reality in most of Africa and the Caribbean, many indigenous leaders credit JPC with consistently portraying them and their countries in a dignified and realistic light. In doing so, they say, EBONY and Jet have not only redefined Black America, but Blacks in other parts of the world as well.

JPC editors recognized early that the same yearning for freedom that triggered the Civil Rights Movement in the United States also unleased the Independence Movement that swept Africa and the Caribbean, and that each movement fueled the other. Consequently, no effort or expense was spared to report the progress of independence abroad, and to counter the stereotypical images of Blacks in the Diaspora with countless, meaningful articles about Africa, the cradle of all mankind, and its rich cultural heritage.

Thus EBONY and Jet readers were able to learn and be inspired by stories about Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, who defied the armies of Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini; Africas Golden Age, featuring the ancient empires of Mali, Ghana and Songhay; independence sweeping Africa in the '60s, induding Ghana, Nigeria, the Ivory Coast and Kenya, and most of the Caribbean nations. EBONY and Jet, in fact, reported every African independence celebration.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

JPC and the Black World: Company's Magazines Championed Freedom of Blacks at Home and Abroad
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?