Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Cornwall but Never Queen Camilla ;Charles Excited.Boys Delighted; ROYAL WEDDING

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 10, 2005 | Go to article overview

Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Cornwall but Never Queen Camilla ;Charles Excited.Boys Delighted; ROYAL WEDDING


Byline: ROB SINGH

CAMILLA Parker Bowles is to be known as HRH the Duchess of Cornwall once she marries Prince Charles - and will never be known as Queen.

When Charles accedes to the throne she will be known as Princess Consort.

The move to allow Charles to be King without his wife being Queen will have to be approved by a special Act of Parliament passed when he takes the throne.

The Queen approved her new daughter-in-law taking the style Her Royal Highness, making her the second most senior royal woman after the Queen.

But the option, which was technically available, of being Princess of Wales, was never seriously considered.

"Legally she is to be the Princess of Wales but she has chosen not to use that title," said a senior royal aide.

Sources say that given the potential backlash it would have opened her up to, considering the affection which the late Diana, Princess of Wales, retains, Mrs Parker Bowles had not wanted to adopt it.

After they marry Camilla's title will come from the Prince's other honorific in England, as Duke of Cornwall. The Duchy of Cornwall is the main source of his income and he holds significant amounts of land and property through it.

The Prince also has titles in Scotland. Mrs Parker Bowles will be known as the Duchess of Rothesay there.

He is Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick and Baron Renfrew, Lord of the Isles and Prince and Great Steward of Scotland.

Mrs Parker Bowles could also use the titles Countess Carrick and Lady Renfrew on engagements there.

The Queen discussed the marriage plans with Charles earlier this year and she sought advice from the Prime Minister last week before she gave her permission.

Her input was crucial and much more than a matter of family courtesty as the Royal Marriages Act gives her, as monarch, a veto over which senior members of the royal family can marry.

The Archbishop of Canterbury advised Charles a civil ceremony was most appropriate for the Church of England. …

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