Students Should Consider Community Colleges

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 2, 2005 | Go to article overview

Students Should Consider Community Colleges


Byline: Rose Rennekamp

Should your teen start college at a community college?

When someone tells you that their teenager is going to college, what comes to mind? Perhaps ivy-covered buildings and tall marble columns; a traditional four-year college or university. If this is your image, it might surprise you to learn that nearly half of all college freshmen are enrolled in a community college.

Is it the right step for your student?

Community colleges used to be known as "junior colleges," and the common perception was that their students got a second-rate education. Now, community colleges provide education and opportunity for anyone from recent high school graduates to 30- somethings looking to pick up some new job skills to 40-somethings looking to change careers.

Many community colleges and universities have formed partnerships, allowing students to transfer credits and sometimes grades earned at the community college toward a degree program at the four-year school. This can encourage students who may not be academically or emotionally ready to go to a four-year school. It's also good news for students who are afraid they can't afford a college education.

If the high cost of a college education causes you to lose sleep, your local community college could be an answer. The average cost of tuition and fees for a full-time student at a community college is about $2,000 per year. Compare that to more than $4,500 for in-state students at a public four-year college or university. The costs at private colleges are higher still.

Granted, financial aid can lessen the impact of high college costs, but some financial aid can also go toward a community college education. Not to mention the fact that you can save money on room and board if your student lives at home while attending community college.

Another consideration may be the kinds of classes they can take at a community college. Class sizes are often smaller, especially for the general education requirements like English, math or science. Larger universities and colleges sometimes put hundreds of freshmen into a political science or biology lecture. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Students Should Consider Community Colleges
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.