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Chertoff OK'd as Homeland Secretary; Nominee Faced Weeks of Delays

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 16, 2005 | Go to article overview

Chertoff OK'd as Homeland Secretary; Nominee Faced Weeks of Delays


Byline: Audrey Hudson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Senate yesterday confirmed Michael Chertoff, a federal judge, as homeland security secretary, making him the second leader of the fledgling agency and filling the last Cabinet seat of President Bush's second administration.

The 98-0 vote for Mr. Chertoff followed weeks of delays by a key Democrat who questioned whether the former Justice Department official had been aware of tactics used to detain and interrogate terror suspects. Sens. Max Baucus, Montana Democrat, and Arlen Specter, Pennsylvania Republican, did not vote.

Harriet Miers, counsel to the president, issued the oath of office to Mr. Chertoff, who was joined by his wife, Meryl, at about 6:30 p.m. at a private White House ceremony, the administration said.

Mr. Chertoff was "subjected to extraordinary scrutiny" and his nomination was delayed unnecessarily, said Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican and chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Tennessee Republican, said Mr. Chertoff, who has promised to balance national security concerns and civil liberties, has "proven his ability to lead in terms of a national crisis." Mr. Chertoff, a U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judge until yesterday, had led the Justice Department's Criminal Division after the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Final confirmation was delayed by Sen. Carl Levin, Michigan Democrat, to protest the Justice Department's decision to redact from a memo names of officials associated with developing policy for the treatment of terror suspects in the United States and at U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The Justice Department has been criticized for possibly violating the rights of terror suspects.

Sen. Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, criticized the Bush administration's "penchant for secrecy," saying it undermines the Senate's role for oversight and clearing nominees.

Mr. Chertoff, 51, said during a committee hearing that he never was involved directly in the decision-making process for the handling of suspects, and answered more than 250 written questions.

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Chertoff OK'd as Homeland Secretary; Nominee Faced Weeks of Delays
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