A New Style in the World of Art

Art Business News, February 2005 | Go to article overview

A New Style in the World of Art


A Critical Praise On Kamran Khavarani's paintings By Albert Boime, professor of Art History at UCLA October 2003

Exalted by the love poems of the thirteenth-century Persian poet, Jalalu'l-Din Rumi, Kamran Khavarani seeks to translate his ecstatic feelings into visual harmonies that celebrate the idea of Presence ... the loving, creative sense expressing potentially in everything and everyone.

With broad sweeping gestures rippling horizontally across the surface in brilliant hues of blue-greens, purples, yellow-greens and oranges, Khavarani visually reflects his inner response to Rumi, evoking the oceanic and cosmic metaphors of the Sufi mystic.

Kamran defines his style as Momentism, bringing love and beauty into the here and now with a maximum of energy and spontaneity that manifests fulfillment of joy in the eternal present. This is an apt term to describe his layered, billowing striations of dazzling color that suggest sunset and cloud effects, the blending of heaven and earth, the living sea washing over us, rejuvenating and elevating the mind to that state of creative union in which the ego ceases to dictate and consciousness merges with the universe of the Beloved.

Kamran Khavarani was born into an artistic family in Iran in 1941. He completed his education with a Master's degree in Architecture and a Ph.D. in Urban Design. His architectural studies were done under the guidance of his mentor Mr. Hooshang Seyhoon, the internationally renowned Iranian authority in art and architecture.

During over forty years of his architectural practice, Khavarani has won international recognition as well as numerous awards including California's highest building award of excellence in single family category, national design award for special events, and the City of Beverly Hills design award in commercial category.

Mr. Khavarani began painting at the age of three. His classical and formal training in arts and architecture influenced his earlier paintings.

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