Islamists Change View of Elections; Reformers Heartened by Results

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Islamists Change View of Elections; Reformers Heartened by Results


Byline: Rasheed Abou-Alsamh, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

JIDDA, Saudi Arabia - Saudi reformers are finding cause for optimism in Saudi Arabia's historic elections this month, even though the winners were almost all committed Islamists.

"The elections were a success in that the Islamists decided that democracy and elections were not against Islam," said Khalid Al-Dukhayil, a professor of political sociology at King Saud University in Riyadh.

"Before, they used to say that elections were 'haram' [not Islamic], but not anymore. In that way, the elections in the Riyadh region were a victory for liberals, too," he said.

With the Bush administration's pushing for greater democracy in the Middle East, the Saudi government on Feb. 10 permitted Riyadh residents to vote for the first time in more than 40 years, choosing seven members of the 14-member municipal council out of a daunting choice of 646 candidates.

Losing candidates protested as soon as the winners were announced, charging the seven had illegally formed an alliance among themselves and circulated short text messages (SMS) on mobile phones claiming they had the backing of religious figures.

The Saudi government, anxious about party politics not getting a start in the kingdom, had set rules for the election that strictly barred any form of alliance among candidates.

But human rights campaigners said there was little chance the protests would be successful and, in any case, did not seem concerned that voters had shown an overwhelming preference for candidates with strong religious backing.

"The results gave several positive indications: that the extremist stranglehold on life here isn't so strong; that the trilogy of money, tribal affiliation and government backing failed miserably; and is a sign of a new and mature society that realizes it must move forward," said Basim Alim, a Jidda-based lawyer and human rights activist.

Tariq Al-Kassabi, who carried Jidda's third precinct with 20,416 votes, compared with 3,199 for his closest competitor, said he had won "by the grace of God, good planning and an early start. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Islamists Change View of Elections; Reformers Heartened by Results
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.