Julia Enjoys an Infallible Touch with Her Apples

The Journal (Newcastle, England), February 22, 2005 | Go to article overview

Julia Enjoys an Infallible Touch with Her Apples


Byline: By Tamzin Lewis

Thirteen writers leapt to the challenge to respond to an exhibition inspired by one of Britain's classic novelists, George Eliot. Tamzin Lewis reports.

Julia Darling's short story Apple is a gem in this diverse and fascinating collection of contemporary writings.

It concerns Andrew, a cleaner who used to be a doctor called Andrea. He loves the smell of apples. His son, who is too embarrassed to speak to his mother/father, also loves the smell of apples.

Julia, of Newcastle, says: "When I started working on the Apple story for the Infallible exhibition, I became interested in the idea of telling a story through different narrators and from shifting points of view."

The seed for the story was planted by a visit to a touring exhibition of photography, painting, sculpture, video and drawing currently showing at Newcastle University's Hatton Gallery.

Julia, fellow of literature and health at the university's School of English Literature, says: "I loved the visual ideas and story telling themes in the exhibition and that is what inspired me. I also thought about George Eliot and how she hid her true identity, yet led such a passionate creative life."

George Eliot was the pseudonym used by writer Mary Ann Evans (1819-1880) whose most famous works include Middlemarch, Silas Marner, Mill On The Floss and Daniel Deronda. These novels and lesser-known poems were used by a group of artists, including Paul Flannery of Blyth and Newcastle University fine art lecturer Brigitte Jurack, as the basis for the Hatton exhibition.

Titled Infallible: In Search of the Real George Eliot, it was designed to reflect the fluid relationships between fiction and visual art.

Roxy Walsh, another fine art lecturer at the university, curated the exhibition and edited the book. She says: "The rewarding thing about the book is that the reader can feel the wind blow between different interpretations of the same thing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Julia Enjoys an Infallible Touch with Her Apples
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.