Burning Secrets of Ancient Breweries

By Hardman, Chris | Americas (English Edition), March-April 2005 | Go to article overview

Burning Secrets of Ancient Breweries


Hardman, Chris, Americas (English Edition)


HIGH ON AN ANDES MOUNTAINTOP, Wari lords prepare to destroy their sacred drinking halls and brewery. As part of their closing ceremony, the elite members of the empire drink chicha, a fermented brew made out of grain and fruit, presented to them in elaborately decorated containers called keros. When the ritual is complete, the Wari set fire to the walls of their ceremonial buildings. As the fire reaches the ceiling, the carefully constructed beams and thatch roofs collapse, burying the remains of a complex and powerful society.

Now, a thousand years later, that closing ceremony has provided archaeologists with a well-preserved site that may be the oldest large-scale brewery ever found in the Andes. The brewery was part of the city of Cerro Baul, built eight thousand feet above sea level on a mountain 250 miles south of Cuzco, Peru.

"The scale of chicha production in this building, with multiple fires and vats, indicates that this was not a home-brewing operation. It was an elaborate brewery that produced massive amounts of chicha," says Patrick Ryan Williams, assistant curator of anthropology at the Field Museum in Chicago. Williams has worked in the Andes since 1991 and has been leading research teams at Cerro Baul since 1997.

The Wari were the first of the great Andean civilizations. Predating the Inca by at least four centuries, the Wari ruled most of the mountainous regions of highland and coastal Peru from A.D. 600 to 1000. Although they lived on steep mountainsides, the Wari were skilled gardeners who developed high-altitude terracing and irrigation systems that yielded peppers, corn, and other food staples. Their closest competitors were the Tiwanaku, who controlled parts of present-day Bolivia, southern Peru, and northern Chile. Surprisingly, the historical record shows no evidence of warfare between the two great civilizations, but instead suggests that the two empires integrated and found a way to share the region's limited water supply.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Burning Secrets of Ancient Breweries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.