Expert Testifies One Drug Test Wasn't Enough Reliability of Single Analysis at Issue in Algonquin Man's Reckless Homicide Trial

By Kovac, Adam | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 28, 2005 | Go to article overview
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Expert Testifies One Drug Test Wasn't Enough Reliability of Single Analysis at Issue in Algonquin Man's Reckless Homicide Trial


Kovac, Adam, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Adam Kovac Daily Herald Staff Writer

More tests were needed to show an Algonquin man had drugs in his system when he drove his car into oncoming traffic, killing a mother and her unborn son, a forensics expert said Thursday.

And despite the results, they wouldn't tell if Brandon Carone was high on cocaine at the time of the March 7, 2003, crash, said David Stafford, the former director of the University of Tennessee's pathology and toxicology department.

"It says this individual has been exposed to cocaine sometime in the past, but you don't know when," Stafford told a Kane County judge.

Stafford's testimony highlighted the fourth and final day of Carone's trial in the death of 31-year-old Kimberly Morvay of West Dundee. She was 10 weeks pregnant.

Carone, 20, faces up to 14 years in prison if convicted of reckless homicide, reckless homicide of an unborn child and other offenses for the crash on Randall Road in Dundee Township.

Investigators maintain Carone was high on cocaine and other drugs. They also say he was speeding and may have fallen asleep when he crossed the median and plowed into Morvay head on, according to earlier testimony.

In their closing arguments, prosecutors repeatedly said the details of the crash point to Carone's drug use as a factor in the crash, which occurred soon after he pleaded guilty to a drug charge in Lake County.

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