Saudi Campaign to Target Terror; Kingdom Tries to Stem Support

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

Saudi Campaign to Target Terror; Kingdom Tries to Stem Support


Byline: David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The government of Saudi Arabia has begun a major media blitz - including billboards, television ads and cartoons for children - designed to combat popular support for terrorists and Islamic extremism.

Adel al-Jubeir, foreign affairs adviser to Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah, compared the campaign to U.S. efforts to change social habits and attitudes during efforts such as the anti-drug "Just say no" campaign.

"Very few Saudis are under the illusion that we don't have a problem. We acknowledge we have a problem," he said.

But he said Saudi support for terrorism came from a "small but very, very vocal extremist minority" and that the kingdom was determined to not have that minority define Saudi culture, politics or Islamic faith.

U.S.-Saudi relations were strained when it was determined that 15 of the 19 September 11 hijackers hailed from the kingdom. Many Saudi mosques were centers of anti-U.S. and anti-Western thought, and Saudi funds helped bankroll schools throughout the Islamic world promoting a severe version of Islam.

Mr. al-Jubeir said Saudi Arabia has made major strides since the September 11 attacks in the United States and a string of terrorist incidents inside the kingdom. Two-thirds of the country's top al Qaeda and Islamist leaders have been captured or killed, and the government has moved to cut off the flow of unregulated Saudi funds sent abroad.

The Saudi spokesman said the public relations campaign, begun last month in the wake of a major international terrorism conference in Riyadh, is the "most complicated" part of the counterterror campaign. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Saudi Campaign to Target Terror; Kingdom Tries to Stem Support
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.