The Job-Finding Secrets of the 'Intrapreneurs.' (Intracompany Job Hunting)

By Kitchen, Patricia | American Banker, November 19, 1992 | Go to article overview

The Job-Finding Secrets of the 'Intrapreneurs.' (Intracompany Job Hunting)


Kitchen, Patricia, American Banker


My position will be eliminated next year, but I'm reluctant to start over again in a new company. My boss is encouraging me to look around in this one. What are the best methods of finding new position in the same company?

Dear Worried:

The most common approach is the obvious one: aggressively pursuing open jobs. And this is the tack that works most often.

But there's a less-known option you can try if you're really daring: persuading the company to create a new position that matches your skills with the company's needs. Lots of "intrapreneurs" have landed good spots with this strategy.

First let's discuss the pursuit of vacant positions. The rule of thumb is to go about it the same way you would look for an outside job.

"There's no law against networking internally," says recruiter John Lucht, author of "Rites of Passage at 100,000-Plus." Aim at other areas in the company and make a point of meeting people who work there.

Toot That Horn

Even if you've worked with someone for 20 years, don't be afraid to reintroduce yourself in a two-minute pitch, says Kate Wendleton, director of a New York job search group.

Say something like, "You may know me as a marketer, but I've done much more than that."

Be aggressive. "Don't wait for the company to find something for you. says one banker who recently found a position in the customer-service area.

The day after she heard that her marketing job was being eliminated, she called all her senior contacts in search of opportunities. But don't make them feel pressured, she warns.

And beware of people who try to get you to bad-mouth the company where your job is ending. She responded by saying: "I'm not happy about it, but I understand the business reasons for it."

The Hard Sell

Also, treat face-to-face discussions like job interviews. Bring a resume, and follow up afterward. And consider all ideas, even about working in a department with a narrow focus or that may have had a bad reputation.

In the meantime, don't slack off. "Deliver 100% on your present job until it is ended" so your reputation doesn't suffer, she says.

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