We're Not a Typical Boy Band; Whatever Their Critics Say, McFly Have a Clear Image of the Music They Want to Make and a Plan for the Future. Shereen Low Reports

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), March 11, 2005 | Go to article overview

We're Not a Typical Boy Band; Whatever Their Critics Say, McFly Have a Clear Image of the Music They Want to Make and a Plan for the Future. Shereen Low Reports


Byline: Shereen Low

SITTING in a West London hotel are two of the hottest singersongwriters in pop.

But as McFly's Tom Fletcher orders a Diet Coke and band-mate Danny Jones asks for an orange juice, it's hard to remember that they are half of a Brit Award-winning pop group.

These are hardly starry requests, although granted both have hangovers.

``I had three or four Guinnesses last night,'' says 18-year-old Danny. ``You have one and then another, and you don't realise the effect they have. After a while, it's just like drinking yoghurt.''

``We haven't really changed,'' says Tom, 19, explaining that the group, crowned Best Pop Act at the Brits, keep their feet on the ground. ``We're still the same as we were four years ago. We don't really go clubbing or live the high life.''

One reason for their down-to-earth attitude could be their recent trip to Africa, where they visited Kamwokya, a village in Uganda funded by Comic Relief.

``It was an absolutely amazing and unforgettable experience. One of the best experiences of my life,'' says Danny, fiddling with the white Make Poverty History band on his wrist.

``It was such a great opportunity for us to experience first-hand what Comic Relief does. We visited a community that got help from last year's Comic Relief money. We saw a clinic that had been set up, along with a school and houses. People there still live in mud huts, with open sewers.

``Going out there gave us a new perspective on life. It made us aware of how lucky we are.

Realising I'm in a position where I might be able to make more people aware of the situation, makes me feel really honoured.''

Their new single, All About You, out on Monday March 7 is also raising money for the charity. All the royalties from the double A-side - also featuring McFly's cover of You've Got A Friend - will be going to Comic Relief.

Tom, Danny and their bandmates, Harry Judd, 19, and 17-year-old Dougie Poynter, have had phenomenal success to date. They had No 1s with their debut single last March, Five Colours InHer Hair, and Obviously, in June. Their double-platinum-selling debut album, Room On The Third Floor, stormed the UK album charts, and earned the band a place in the Guinness Book Of Records, as the youngest band to debut at No 1 with their first album - a record previously held by the Beatles.

``Everything that has happened is brilliant and absolutely awesome - it's been a pretty mad year,'' says Tom with a grin. ``We haven't even been out a year yet, so it's amazing. We didn't expect half of what's happened.''

The band are not ashamed of their pop-act tag. In fact, McFly are proud of who they are, despite criticism from rock bands such as Kasabian for being a ``pop act for kids''. …

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We're Not a Typical Boy Band; Whatever Their Critics Say, McFly Have a Clear Image of the Music They Want to Make and a Plan for the Future. Shereen Low Reports
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