Trading in Human Misery: The Trafficking of Children Is a Growing Problem in Yemen, with Immoral and Unprincipled "Dealers" Making Money out of Smuggling Children across the Border into Remote Areas of Saudi Arabia

By Willems, Peter | The Middle East, March 2005 | Go to article overview

Trading in Human Misery: The Trafficking of Children Is a Growing Problem in Yemen, with Immoral and Unprincipled "Dealers" Making Money out of Smuggling Children across the Border into Remote Areas of Saudi Arabia


Willems, Peter, The Middle East


THE INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANISATION (ILO) reports that more than 1.2m children are trafficked every year worldwide, many of them ending up being used as forced labour or for sexual exploitation. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has warned that people trafficking, mostly of women and children, is a serious and escalating problem, as the authorities in Yemen have discovered.

Awareness of children being trafficked out of Yemen has been growing over the last year, and the government and various aid organisations have recently acknowledged it as a problem that unscrupulous "traders" have turned into a lucrative business, often with the support of unsuspecting parents.

"This is a problem and one which appears to be growing," confirmed Ramesh Shrestha, a UNICEF representative based in Yemen. "There are different issues on the definition of and whether it should be described as trafficking or illegal immigration but whatever you call it, it is definitely a problem."

Yemen's Ministry of Social Affairs, together with UNICEF, carried out the first study in Hajja and Al Mahweet, two provinces near the Yemeni-Saudi border and believed to be the major transit point used by the highest concentration of child traffickers, according to interviews and group discussions with victims, families, convicted traffickers and government authorities.

A UNICEF spokesperson observed that although the governments of Yemen and Saudi Arabia are working to prevent this appalling trade in human lives, more must be done if it is to be stamped out. What makes their task even more difficult is the fact that most children are being sent away from home with the knowledge and approval of their parents.

The majority of parents interviewed for the survey said they had sought out and paid traffickers to take their children abroad to find work, in order to supplement the family income. However, it was clear the families had no idea of the dangers and heartache their children would face while living abroad without parental guidance or protection.

Many of the children interviewed complained of hunger and getting lost. Reports claim that some even died on the journey to Yemen's northern border. Many children said they had been robbed, while others claimed they were beaten by security officials. Nearly 65% of all the trafficked children interviewed did not have a place to stay and ended up living on the streets.

The most common form of earning money was said to be begging or becoming a street vendor. Research teams were not able to carry out a full assessment of sexual exploitation. But according to one woman interviewed for the survey, children are frequently sexually abused, often by the traffickers themselves before they get to their destination.

The primary cause of child trafficking in Yemen is a result of poverty. Over 60% of the children interviewed came from households earning less than $108 a month and with eight or more family members. Some families said the funds sent home by their children were a significant financial support. One parent claimed his children's wages had doubled the family income.

"Child trafficking is one of the bad symptoms of people suffering from poverty," said Amat Al Aleem Al Soswa, Yemen's minister of human rights. "If families were well off, parents would not have to let their children go to places where they would be vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. …

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