Beating Heart Disease: No. 1 Killer Suffers Lack of Proper Funding

By Widhalm, Shelley | The World and I, August 2004 | Go to article overview

Beating Heart Disease: No. 1 Killer Suffers Lack of Proper Funding


Widhalm, Shelley, The World and I


Shelley Widhalm is a staff writer for The Washington Times.

Pink ribbons remind women of breast cancer, and the Red Dress Pin is doing the job for the nation's No. 1 killer, heart disease.

"Not too many years ago, we thought of heart disease as a disease of middle-aged men," says Dr. Stuart Seides, associate director of cardiology at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C. "A very different human face has been put on heart disease. I think that's what shakes the dollars out of the rafters."

NIH's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and partner organizations are sponsoring the Heart Truth campaign this year with pins and free risk-factor screenings to increase women's awareness of a disease that, according to the American Heart Association, claims the lives of up to a half-million women a year.

Government agencies and private institutions fund research, treatment, or prevention of diseases whether or not they receive the limelight or are a top cause of death. The top causes in 2001, after heart disease, included cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, and diabetes, as identified by the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Several health professionals say funding amounts lag behind the needs for these top diseases, pointing to heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, which remain among the top 10 causes of death, they say.

"Funding priorities are not based on simple raw numbers of death," says Dorraine Watts, who holds a doctorate in biostatistics and research design. She is also the executive director of research for Inova Health System at Fairfax Inova Hospital in Falls Church, Virginia. "You have to look at which groups are dying, but you also have to look at which groups are affected."

Funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the CDC in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) come from Congress, which sets funding priorities and amounts for the two agencies.

NIH distributes research funds according to the number of people who have and who die from each type of disease, the degree of disability a disease causes, its potential danger to public health, and its associated economic and social costs. The agency funds medical and behavioral research to help diagnose and treat disease and disability.

Alternatively, CDC focuses funding on protecting people's health and safety and providing disease prevention and control. The agency distributes funds based on the causes of death from diseases and infections, the rate they can spread, the likelihood they can be treated and prevented, and the access to care for underserved populations at risk.

"We are, of course, interested in and work on the things that are currently causing illness, disability and death," says Dr. Dixie Snider, acting deputy director for public health science at CDC, which is based in Atlanta. "We also have to think about what has been and what could ... potentially happen that we need to prepare for."

Heart disease, the top cause of death and disability among Americans, receives less funding from CDC and NIH than do several other diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and AIDS/HIV, though heart disease is the No. 1 killer across all genders, age groups, and races, Seides says. "There's a mismatch between the funding for research and the incidence and importance of cardiovascular disease, both locally and nationally," he says.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beating Heart Disease: No. 1 Killer Suffers Lack of Proper Funding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.