Philosophy of Ronald Reagan Lives on in Memorable Phrases

The World and I, August 2004 | Go to article overview

Philosophy of Ronald Reagan Lives on in Memorable Phrases


Quotes by Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan was noted for his eloquence and wit, both in formal speeches and in ad-libbed humor. Here are some of his memorable phrases, excerpted from The Common Sense of an Uncommon Man (Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1998), a book compiled by the former president's son, Michael Reagan:

"My friends, some years ago the federal government declared war on poverty--and poverty won."--State of the Union address, Jan. 25, 1988

* * *

"If we lose freedom here, there is no place to escape to. This is the last stand on Earth."--"A Time for Choosing," a televised address to the nation on behalf of Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater, Oct. 27, 1964

* * *

"You can't be for big government, big taxes and big bureaucracy and still be for the little guy."--speech in San Diego, Nov. 7, 1988

* * *

"Politics is supposed to be the second-oldest profession. I have come to realize it bears a very close resemblance to the first."--speech in Los Angeles, March 2, 1977

* * *

"Conservatism is the antithesis of the kind of ideological fanaticism that has brought so much horror and destruction to the world. The common sense and common decency of ordinary men and women, working out their own lives in their own way--this is the heart of American conservatism today."--speech in Washington, Feb. 6, 1977

* * *

"I love freedom not only because it's practical and beneficial, but because it is morally right and just."--televised address to the nation, Nov. 14, 1985

* * *

"There seems to be an increasing awareness of something we Americans have known for some time--that the 10 most dangerous words in the English language are 'Hi, I'm from the government, and I'm here to help.' "--address to the Future Farmers of America, July 28, 1988

* * *

"We intend to keep the peace--we will also keep our freedom. …

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