Health Research Impacts on NHS

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), March 22, 2005 | Go to article overview
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Health Research Impacts on NHS


A major new initiative to bring greater focus and attention to the quality and importance of world-class research in health and medicine at Durham University has been launched with the announcement of a Health Strategy Board.

The new Health Strategy Board for education and research brings together the leading academics and research groups in a unique collaboration with the top practitioners and decision makers in the NHS as well as key players from regional bodies, local government and national research bodies.

The Health Strategy Board's overall aim is to make a real difference to the health and well-being of people living in the region by demonstrating an active and meaningful engagement with the NHS through the work of the university's research groups.

It will seek to make a significant contribution to the quality of life and effectiveness of health care by co-ordinating teaching, research and links with the NHS and partners by promoting a new understanding of the real value and impact of collaborative working.

The new initiative is regarded as one of the most significant developments for many years in the field of medicine and health. It is mainly centred at the University's Wolfson Research Institute, which since its foundation in Stockton in 2001 has become established as a world-class centre working to tackle many of the region's health problems.

Leaders of health care provision, medical and clinical research, hospitals, NHS Healthcare Trusts, national and regional representatives of government departments, research organisations funding bodies, other universities, local and regional partnerships, have been brought up to date with the excellence of research work at Durham University and its impact on the NHS.

Sir Derek Wanless, special advisor to the Government on health service resourcing and public health issues gave a keynote address at the launch.

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