Look: Health: Fit for Life Just a Little of What You Fancy

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), March 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

Look: Health: Fit for Life Just a Little of What You Fancy


Byline: JANE WOODHEAD

IT JUST wouldn't be Easter without chocolate and I think everyone has to indulge - at least a little.

Throughout history chocolate has been considered something special - the ancient Mayans used it in religious rituals, while the Aztecs used cocoa beans as currency.

By the 17th century, when chocolate was introduced to London, the wealthy were prepared to pay the staggering equivalent of pounds 500 for a pound.

Many studies even claim that chocolate can be good for you.

It contains a naturally occurring antidepressant - phenylethylamine - which increases the serotonin levels in the brain and it also contains a range of vitamins, minerals and complex alkaloids, all of which enhance health and a sense of well-being.

Chantal Coady, author of Real Chocolate and owner of London confectioners, Rococo Chocolates, believes chocolate is one of the most nutritious and easily digested foods known.

She claims that chocolate is so beneficial to our general good health that she would like her products

to be made available free of charge on the NHS to treat patients suffering from pre-menstrual tension and depression

FOR all of us taking part in the London Marathon in just THREE weeks time - yes that is all it is - you will all have received your racing number and instructions for race day through the post. …

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