MILLS AND BRIGADOON; Americans Go Wild for Kilt-Ripper Romances

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), March 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

MILLS AND BRIGADOON; Americans Go Wild for Kilt-Ripper Romances


Byline: By Christina Stokes

SMOULDERING Scottish heroes are sending American women weak at the knees.

Bodice-ripper historical romances have been overtaken by the kilt-ripper - featuring heather-covered hills, feisty heroines and brooding kilt-clad hunks.

And authors say the macho heroes are the main reason for them claiming a huge chunk of the pounds 1.4billion-a-year romance novels market in the US.

The raunchy books have titles such as Devil In A Kilt, Master Of The Highlands and Heaven And The Heather and feature semi-clad men with rippling muscles on their covers.

Sue-Ellen Welfonder, author of Devil In A Kilt, says American women find Scotsmen incredibly sexy.

Floridian Sue-Ellen, who claims Scots ancestry and is a member of the Clan MacFie Society in the US, said: 'It's the kilts. That or the men that fit in them.'

And readers agree. In an internet cha-troom, one, known as Keltictemptress34, writes: 'Scottish men are so passionate and uncontrollable.The thought of trying to tame one makes me weak at the knees.'

Wantonlass - whose grasp of geography is a little shaky, adds: 'And the warriors! The thought that one could seize you and take you back to his Highland castle in the Borders. …

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