Letter: Laziness Costs

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), April 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Letter: Laziness Costs


Byline: Jim O'Neil

THE comments in Phil Redmond's column last week regarding rush-hour traffic raised a few interesting points. He is spot on when he says that the 'school holiday (traffic) patterns illustrate that our road system is perfectly adequate for most of the time'.

There does seem to be a growing realisation of the truth of something many of us have known for a long time - in Wirral, the rush hour is not just made worse but actually caused simply by two factors - the tunnel toll booths and the school run. The first should have been abolished 30 or more years ago, but we don't need to wait any time at all to solve the second problem.

My colleagues and myself at one of my employers, Wirral Environmental Network, have been trying for more than two years to raise funding to employ a co-ordinator to increase the number of 'walking buses' in Wirral. The Council has generously offered us help in kind - equipment, insurance, advertising and so on - but no funders seem willing to pay the salary fo r this worthwhile post.

I know that some parents, and, indeed, some pupils, are disabled and simply cannot walk to school, but this is a tiny proportion (has the amount ever been recorded?) and in the vast majority of cases it is simply laziness. I would imagine that I am not alone in seeing parents loading their children into massive so-called offroad vehicles to drive them a mile or two - easily within walking Doc. …

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