Technology Education-Putting Science to Work!

By Thode, Terry | Technology and Children, March 2005 | Go to article overview

Technology Education-Putting Science to Work!


Thode, Terry, Technology and Children


There are some of us Tech Ed types who spend a lot of time trying to explain to others the difference between science and technology education. I'm not going to try that here! Let's leave it that technology education puts science to work for us in ways we can relate to.

Here's an example. I can remember countless times in science classes, both in primary and secondary school, when I rolled marbles or similar objects on an inclined plane to study momentum and how forces affected that object. It was certainly more fun than reading about momentum and gravity, but once I left the class I didn't think too much more about it. I definitely didn't relate it to riding my bicycle "lickety-split" down the sidewalk, nor later when I could drive, think of the car as that marble picking up speed and in need of a sure way to stop.

So what can you do to make science more real to your elementary students? The answer is easy. Add the technology education component to your curriculum and show your students how we use science to help us design and build safer and progressively better devices to help us and the environment.

So next we need to get our elementary teachers excited about adding another aspect to their busy days--not an easy task at all. Many school districts have put science on the "back burner" while trying to get students to read better and perform math with some sense of accomplishment. Technology education might not even be part of their vocabulary yet, but our intention is to make that happen! The neat thing about technology education is that it integrates with every subject. So what you need to do as a teacher is take what you already teach in science and ask yourself how it is used in today's world or how an existing technology uses the science. If you can't figure out a way to make it real for your students, then it's just information passing through and not worth your time or theirs! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Technology Education-Putting Science to Work!
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.