Plagiarism Fears over Online Sites

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 7, 2005 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Plagiarism Fears over Online Sites


Byline: By JENNY REES Western Mail

Popular web-based auction sites such as eBay could be contributing to the rising number of plagiarism cases occurring at universities, throwing into question higher education standards in the UK in general. According to academics at the University of Glamorgan, more and more students at UK universities are turning to commercial sales sites to both buy and sell dissertations and essays on the web.

Dr Mike Reddy, who did the research, commented, 'Since the introduction of the internet to university life, students have been downloading research material from web sites and essay banks. However our current research shows a growing trend towards students purchasing essays from sites such as eBay under the belief that, should they choose to copy the work, they run less of a risk of getting caught.

'Essays on these sites appear for sale without the usual 'only for research' tags, common on essay bank sites, giving purchasing students the impression that they can legitimately claim it as their own. This in turn can falsely inflate a student's overall degree grade which could result in them gaining a job outside of their actual capabilities.'

By studying the site over a short period of time, senior lecturer Dr Reddy, and his colleagues at the University of Glamorgan's School of Computing, found that particular buyers show a repetitive history of purchasing dissertations and reports on related topics.

Sellers also show a track record of selling essays on a range of topics, and in one notable case offering advice on how to get the dissertation past the tutor.

'EBay keeps a history of names and name changes of its sellers and buyers and one only needs to log on to the site and check the individual profiles to discover that certain buyers and sellers do business on a frequent basis,' explained Dr Reddy, who is a member of the Joint Information Systems Committee Plagiarism Advisory Service.

But while some buyers might consider eBay a 'safer' source than downloading information from the web which is less likely to be detected, research shows that at least one essay bank site is using eBay as a front for sales.

Some sellers even appear to regularly sell the same item, despite statements such as 'your only chance to own' and 'one time only'.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Plagiarism Fears over Online Sites
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.