The Librarians' Hi-Tech Future

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), April 13, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Librarians' Hi-Tech Future


L is for librarian

We are living in an age of hi-tech communication and information exchange.

And as a result the information professionals' role has changed significantly.

Many traditional information roles no long have the term "library" or "librarian" in their job title.

There has been a growth in electronic and digital libraries.

You may see the following job titles in job adverts: information manager; internet librarian; knowledge assistant; learning advisor or web developer.

WHAT SKILLS WOULD YOU NEED?

* Developed specialised subject knowledge.

* Being able to use appropriate information technology to select, organise and find material.

* Producing alerting services.

* Ability to team work.

* Effective communication.

* Customer service skills.

While public libraries spring to the mind of many people when they think of librarians, there are actually opportunities to work in a wide variety of sectors.

Information professionals can be found in business and industry, science and technology, further and higher education, schools, local and central government, the health service, the voluntary sector, national and public libraries.

And school leavers, graduates and career changers can all take the path in to this profession.

Library and information professionals work in a variety of sectors. They include:

* Business libraries including newspaper archives.

* Children and youth libraries.

* Further education colleges.

* Government libraries.

* Health libraries.

* Law libraries.

* Not-for-profit libraries.

* Prison libraries.

* Public libraries.

* School and university libraries.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

School leavers can become library assistants with GCSEs or A-levels and start work in a library.

If you have been working in a library for two years and are an affiliated member of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals you can continue your personal development to gain certification. …

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