LIFESTYLE: Boxing Champ to Dapper Chap

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), April 14, 2005 | Go to article overview

LIFESTYLE: Boxing Champ to Dapper Chap


Byline: SANDRA CHAPMAN

From street kid to boxing champion of the world to fashion trend setter. Chris Eubank may have hung up his boxing gloves for good but he's still an enigmatic figure as SANDRA CHAPMAN found out on his recent visit to Belfast

CHRIS Eubank is no longer a world class boxing star but at the age of 37 he still turns heads wherever he goes. His love of fashion means he automatically attracts attention. Not for him the denims with holes in the knees, shapeless track suits or trousers with hems trailing the ground. How he looks is as important to him as breathing and he's almost as famous now for his sartorial elegance as he was for his boxing. Trilby hats, well tailored trousers, Italian shoes, Edwardian-style coats are his fashion statement but then he learned the lessons of how the well dressed are regarded when he was young.

Born in London of Jamaican parents Chris was interested in clothes from an early age and in the west Indian community where he lived he knew that people gained 'points of respect' for the interest they took in their appearance.

He loved the strong, bright colours of his parents' native country but knew he would have to be a bit more subtle for the English audience. And over the years he has developed a look that reflects some of the best eras in British fashion . He likes the elegance of the Edwardian period and the almost-dandy look of the 20's and 30's when fashion was revolutionised. Chris: "I'm quite partial to the Edwardian era which was a lovely period for fashion and I like to set trends. Clothes just make me feel good. They say something about you.''

After he hung up his gloves Chris was such a popular afterdinner speaker that he eventually set up a business training people to be motivational speakers. He is inundated with corporate work yet still finds time to speak to young people in universities, secondary and primary school all over the country. In fact Oxford and Cambridge have asked him back numerous times.

He feels it's important to talk to young people about what they can get out of life if they put some effort in.

He lives in Brighton with his wife Karron and their three sons and one daughter. A devoted father he's concerned about his eldest son's interest in boxing.

He says: "He's beginning to wear me down about getting involved in boxing but I have told him not to get involved. He would have a tougher time because of my involvement in the sport.

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