Obituaries


Yvonne S. Bennett, associate professor of library and information services at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York, died recently. She was a founder and former president of the New York Black Librarians Caucus, and an active member of the local chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. * Hardy R. Franklin, 75, who retired as District of Columbia Public Library director in 1997 after nearly 23 years of service, died of Alzheimer's disease complicated by diabetes August 22. Among his accomplishments were programs that reflected his conviction that service to children be central to the library's mission, such as Reach Out And Read, which brings storytellers and reading readiness activities to child-care providers, and Dial-A-Story, which offers weekly three-minute stories by phone. Franklin, who served as 1993-94 ALA president, received the Public Library Association's 1983 Allie Beth Martin Award, which honors a librarian who demonstrates extraordinary range and depth of knowledge about books or other library materials and who has distinguished ability to share that knowledge. * Janet B. Foster, 56, librarian at Danbury (Conn.) Public Library, died of a heart attack August 8. In 1994, she won the Connecticut Library Association's annual scholarship award. She also was instrumental in bringing the community into the Internet age, building the library's first web page in 1996, and working on Danbury's community computer network to help organizations such as the hospital and city hall to get online in the late '90s. * Millicent Lenz Gilson, 68, professor of children's literature at State University of New York School of Information Science and Policy in Albany from 1984-2003, died June 10. She was author of the highly regarded book Nuclear Literature for Youth and Children (ALA, 1990) and a member of the National Children's Literature Association and the Modern Language Association. * Peter S. Graham, 65, university librarian at Syracuse (N.Y.) University, died August 11 of lymphoma. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Obituaries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.