They Don't Know How We Do It, and They Don't Care Either: Financial Pressure and Guilt Are Driving Middle-Class Working Mothers out of Their Careers, to Become Increasingly Desperate Housewives. Viv Groskop Reports

By Groskop, Viv | New Statesman (1996), April 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

They Don't Know How We Do It, and They Don't Care Either: Financial Pressure and Guilt Are Driving Middle-Class Working Mothers out of Their Careers, to Become Increasingly Desperate Housewives. Viv Groskop Reports


Groskop, Viv, New Statesman (1996)


I have a friend who probably won't bother to vote because no one is offering anything that has any relevance to her life. I'll call her Caroline, as it conjures up the right image: excellent comprehensive, history degree from Durham, a high-flying job in broadcasting.

Since she had a baby last year, her perfect career and wonderful life have fallen apart. She's still married, her baby is healthy, she has kept her job. But her life has become one of quiet misery.

Where she was once a star player, her employers now see her as a special case, and enjoy reminding her that they are providing the ultimate in generosity and political correctness by letting her work a four-day week--a favour she is never allowed to forget by her childless and/or male colleagues.

More than two-thirds of her income is wiped out by nursery and childminding fees. She feels she should be pathetically grateful for her four-day week, but in her heart, she knows that the set-up has made no difference, apart from making her workmates resentful and envious.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Like so many middle-class mothers, Caroline is close to cracking. They feel they're not giving their children or their work their best, and that they have let themselves down as well. Too rich to get any help from state initiatives, too poor to live off their husband's salary or afford a full-time nanny, they are stuck in the middle: supposedly privileged but unhappy and guilty.

This is not a group that immediately or obviously inspires sympathy. But it should. This is a generation of women that has had the opportunity to climb the career ladder and reach senior positions--managers, supervisors, leaders--but what they have achieved is being taken away. They are finding that family circumstances are driving them back into the Fifties. Many are likely to end up as increasingly desperate housewives.

On paper, middle-class mothers are well off, their households generating more than the average combined income of [pounds sterling]41,000. In reality, their comfortable life has changed unrecognisably--and not just financially. Their status has dramatically altered, too. Suddenly, the woman's salary is seen as some sort of optional extra not making that much difference. This feeling, coupled with the guilt factor over full-time childcare, is pushing too many women back into housewife territory. It's the "sod this, I'm giving up" attitude echoed by the women interviewed in last month's deeply disturbing New Woman magazine survey. Two-thirds of respondents said they thought men should be the main breadwinners, and 70 per cent said they didn't intend to work as hard as their mothers.

Telling middle-class mothers to shut up and get on with it, or to opt out and become domestic goddesses, is like telling a child to eat everything on the plate because there are babies starving in Ethiopia. Working-class women will not be any better off if middle-class women stop complaining and/or give up work. Another aspect of moving back towards the Fifties is a lack of female role models further up the food chain.

It's hard to know where election pledges could make headway here. In some ways, this is not an issue about party politics as, in essence, the three main parties' pledges on families and children do not differ substantially. They all want to increase the payment for and length of maternity leave (which, incidentally, not all mothers support, many wanting flexibility when they return, not more time off). …

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