St. Louis Bargains Make a Nickel Worth a Dime, So to Speak

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

St. Louis Bargains Make a Nickel Worth a Dime, So to Speak


Byline: Mike Michaelson

"When you come to a fork in the road, take it." That convoluted travel advice comes from Yogi Berra, Baseball Hall of Famer and infamous (but endearing) butcher of the English language.

You can learn about the famed catcher, who earned a record 10 championship rings and multiple listings in "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations," if you head for St. Louis - Berra's hometown - and visit the "Baseball as America" exhibit at the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park.

If you feel that, as Berra once observed, "A nickel ain't worth a dime anymore," St. Louis is the spot to stretch your travel budget. Many of its attractions offer free general admission, including a world-class, 90-acre zoo that contains more than 11,400 exotic animals of 810 species, many rare and endangered. Also gratis is admission to a science museum, fine-art museum and history museum.

All of these cultural attractions are in leafy Forest Park. Last year, a $90 million renovation spruced up this 1,370-acre park that is larger than New York's Central Park.

Also helping stretch travel budgets are numerous discounted hotel packages in conjunction with events. These include the baseball exhibition and this year's 40th anniversary of the Gateway Arch.

"Baseball as America," organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, features more than 500 artifacts from Cooperstown. It runs through April 24, coinciding with the Cubs' first visit (April 20 and 21) to the St. Louis Cardinals, its traditional archrival. (This is the last season the Redbirds will play at Busch Stadium. Next year, the team moves to a new stadium just south of the current field.)

On display are record-setting bats from Babe Ruth and Roger Maris as well as Jackie Robinson's jersey, vintage trading cards and film clips of baseball's historic moments. Pride of place goes to a Berra glove and baseball.

On the narrow streets of the neighborhood known as "The Hill," Berra first flexed his muscles (and perhaps began mangling the language). Full of friendly trattoria and colorful markets, The Hill is well worth visiting - especially around the dinner hour. Lined with tiny, neat bungalows with well-tended postage-stamp front yards, this 20-block neighborhood is as Italian as the bocce ball games played there. More than 75 percent of its residents are of Italian descent.

Dining choices on The Hill are numerous and virtually every St. Louis resident seems to have a particular favorite. Favazza's, for example, enjoys a large local following. It occupies a circa 1905 building,once an Italian confectioners, and offers well-made pastas, traditional Italian specialties such as veal piccata and addictive garlic bread. Decor features bar-brick walls, stained glass and a high, brown tin ceiling.

For a splurge, Dominic's is an intimate restaurant where waiters wear black ties, tables wear crisp white napery and Renaissance- style decor features crystal chandeliers, red carpets and oil paintings. Emphasis is on traditional regional dishes. Try virtually any pasta dish and thick, tender veal chops, starting, perhaps, with tenderloin carpaccio or mussels in white wine with fresh tomato.

Newest habitat at the progressive Saint Louis Zoo is Fragile Forest, which debuts May 13 as home of the zoo's great apes. It expands the outdoor habitat with natural-like areas for two endangered species, chimpanzees and orangutans. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

St. Louis Bargains Make a Nickel Worth a Dime, So to Speak
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.