Breeding Parasites along with Fish: Do Sea Lice from Salmon Farms Spread Far?

By Harder, B. | Science News, April 2, 2005 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Breeding Parasites along with Fish: Do Sea Lice from Salmon Farms Spread Far?


Harder, B., Science News


Marine parasites known as sea lice spread readily from farmed salmon to wild fish, according to a study of wild salmon in British Columbia. The researchers, funded by several environmental groups, say their work underscores a possible ecological hazard in aquaculture, but critics of the study question the value of its data.

Various sea lice occasionally latch on to the skin of wild saltwater fishes, reducing swimming efficiency and increasing vulnerability to diseases. These lice are a greater problem among farmed fish concentrated in pens.

Some evidence links salmon farms in Atlantic coastal waters to frequent lice infestations among neighboring wild salmon, and scientists have warned that expanding the aquaculture now present in Pacific water could create new reservoirs of disease.

To assess the impact of a British Columbian salmon farm that harbors sea lice, researchers at the University of Alberta in Edmonton examined juvenile wild pink and chum salmon at points along migration corridors that pass close to the farm.

Twenty kilometers up a fjord from the farm, few wild salmon have lice, Martin Krkosek and his colleagues report in an upcoming Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Immature lice are common on wild fish that are passing the farm, and older lice generally predominate on salmon farther along on their journey to the sea.

From the data, Krkosek and his colleagues constructed a mathematical model. It suggests that lice are 73 times as prevalent on salmon near the farm as in distant waters and that the farm elevates infestation rates in salmon as far as 75 km beyond its pens.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Breeding Parasites along with Fish: Do Sea Lice from Salmon Farms Spread Far?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.