Rogue Regimes; Anti-Americanism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 24, 2005 | Go to article overview

Rogue Regimes; Anti-Americanism


Byline: Arnold Beichman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Prince Otto von Bismarck once said: "We live in a wondrous time in which the strong is weak because of his moral scruples and the weak grows strong because of his audacity."

What would he say today looking upon a nightmare called North Korea which Jasper Becker's Rogue Regime: Kim Il and the Looming Threat of North Korea (Oxford, $27, 288 pages) shows has been ruled for half a century by paranoia and megalomania? In the pre-nuclear age North Korea with a population of some 21 million would be regarded as a minor blip in a world of socio-economic powers with great armories. The Bomb has changed all that. Yet even without The Bomb a lone assassin in Sarajevo armed with a revolver helped start the Great War of 1914.

Jasper Becker, a veteran foreign correspondent has written a book which tells as much as can be known about this hidden Communist dictatorship. The key to North Korea, he says, is in the hands of Communist China.

* * *

Thank You, President Bush: Reflections on the War on Terrorism, Defense of the Family and Revival of the Economy (World Ahead, $24.99, 370 pages) is a collection of essays edited by Anan Verjee and Rod D. Martin, dedicated to President George W. Bush and written by an all-star cast including such policy-making leaders like George Shultz, Bill Bennett, Gov. Jeb Bush, John Ashcroft and Phyllis Schlafly.

It is not an ad hominem attack book a la Michael Moore. The writers are all unapologetic admirers of the president. One of the most interesting chapters deals with the Bush tax cuts which ignited an economic boom despite corporate scandals and a stock market crash which turned out to be a minor blip on the Wall Street radar.

* * *

This history, Bat Ye'Or's The Euro-Arab Axis (Farleigh Dickinson, $23.95, 384 pages) is guaranteed to disturb a reader who hasn't yet discerned, as has the author, Europe's evolution "from a Judeo-Christian civilization with important post-Enlightenment secular elements, into a post Judeo-Christian civilization that is subservient to the ideology of jihad and the Islamic powers that propagate it.

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