Viewpoint: CAPITAL EYE

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), April 26, 2005 | Go to article overview

Viewpoint: CAPITAL EYE


Byline: TOM BODDEN

IN these days of over-hyped, super-slick over-tired and emotional celebrity feting, there is something almost under-stated about the Welsh Baftas.

There is still the glamour of the posh frocks and a sprinkling of star names, a huge set with giant screens to display the work of the talented.

Yet the years of pyrotechnics, drumming bands marching around the auditorium, floods of tears and endless speech-making, it would seem, are gone.

Television stopped broadcasting the Welsh industry's own awards night years ago.

But lessons seemed to have been learned by the 14th annual Bafta Cymru awards night at the weekend.

The presentations now come before the dinner, which at least might explain the lack of excitable outbursts from recipients whose champagne corks were yet to pop.

And the move to a Saturday instead of a Sunday means those who need to get to work the next day don't have to turn up in a dinner jacket.

It is still a good night out even if, as harshly suggested, the rest of the UK industry might not be watching.

Why shouldn't friends celebrate their achievements together with a touch of style ITV Wales was back among the awards after a difficult year when the axe swung over regional programming, while BBC Wales chalked up 14 and S4C eight. So everyone was generally happy.

None more so than Ruthin-born actor Rhys Ifans, who won the first ever Sin Phillips award, presented by the actress herself, for achievements outside of Wales. …

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