Donald Swenholt, 79, Retired Colonel

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Donald Swenholt, 79, Retired Colonel


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Donald Brunhoff Swenholt, a retired Air Force colonel, died of natural causes April 26 at Inova Fairfax Hospital. He was 79.

Col. Swenholt was born Aug. 5, 1925, in Gary, Ind. He entered the Air Force after graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., in 1948.

He flew 290 combat missions during two tours of duty in Southeast Asia, earning the Silver Star, three Legions of Merit and two Distinguished Flying Crosses. His flying career included ratings as a command pilot, radar observer and bombardier in several types of aircraft, including the B-47, B-50 and B-57.

From 1961 to 1964, he served at the Warfare Systems School in Montgomery, Ala., as an instructor on ballistic missiles, orbits and trajectories, the effects of nuclear weapons and counterinsurgency.

In 1970, he wrote the portion of the president's foreign policy report that came to be known as the Nixon Doctrine. It stated that, although the United States will help allies develop security measures, those governments must make the major effort to ensure their security.

The doctrine resulted from public reaction to U.S. intervention in Vietnam in the 1960s and was tied to the Nixon administration's efforts to remove U.S. forces from Indochina.

Col. Swenholt, as the executive agent for the secretary of defense, personally led the U. …

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