Secluded McLean Estate a Custom Gem

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Secluded McLean Estate a Custom Gem


Byline: Michele Lerner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Two curving brick-and-stone walls embrace the entrance to the community of Woodlea Mill, off Springhill Road in McLean, where custom estate homes harmonize with each other and the professionally designed landscaping of the development.

Landscape architects, architects, custom cabinetmakers, master carpenters, kitchen and bath designers, expert painters and builders have worked together to make each residence in this upscale development a jewel.

One estate in this community, at 1165 Orlo Drive, is on the market for $4,500,000.

Designed to resemble a French chateau in Provence, this estate provides seclusion and privacy for an extended family or a family that loves to entertain.

Cobblestone and flagstone driveways, paths and terraces surround the home, which is placed on a gently sloping hill with a screen of mature trees across the front of the property. Virginia bluestone walls blend with stucco and arched wood detailing for a charming effect.

Built in 1996, this elegant property includes a circular drive with several parking areas, an attached two-car garage and a detached two-car garage with a carriage house above.

Surrounding the back and one side of the home are flagstone terraces interspersed with garden beds and low stone walls.

A terrace on the side of the house provides a private location for morning coffee off the master suite, and a gazebo offers a shady spot for relaxing next to the heated swimming pool. The adjacent pool house has a flagstone floor, a full bath, a changing room, a kitchenette and an indoor hot tub.

Beyond the swimming pool and surrounding terrace is a wide stretch of grass perfect for touch football games or entertaining under a tent.

A few steps lead from the pool terrace to another stone terrace accessible from the breakfast room. Sculptures that have been placed in various locations around the gardens will convey to the buyers.

The carriage house above the detached garage includes a large room with dormer windows and skylights, two closets and a full bath. The space could function easily as a private office, a studio for dance or artwork, or as a guest cottage.

The main house provides more than 10,000 finished square feet of living space on three levels.

Guests are welcomed in an elegant two-story foyer with marble flooring, a curving wood staircase and a view straight through to the French doors leading into the gardens.

Flanking the foyer are the formal living room and formal dining room, each with etched and leaded glass doors. Repeated architectural details inside the home include tray ceilings and arched doorways, and the living room includes columns in addition to the archway.

One of the home's four fireplaces is also located in the living room.

The dining room includes a bay window, wainscoting and wallpaper, and an entrance to the butler's pantry.

The two-story family room, a dramatic room with a tray ceiling, cove lighting and walls of windows flanking a marble fireplace, also has views of the gardens and swimming pool.

The family room has etched and leaded glass doors linking the room to the breakfast room and also has a pass-through to the kitchen with a sink that can function as a bar.

A tradition of the builder of Woodlea Mill is to include at least one European antique item in each home.

In the Orlo Drive property, an elaborately detailed dresser has been renovated to function as the powder room vanity. Nearby, a wall of antique European cabinets has been incorporated into the library as a built-in bookcase that blends easily with the modern bookcases and cabinets in the room.

The library also has a bay window with a garden view and transom windows above the French doors that open onto the foyer.

The kitchen has been designed for entertaining easily as well as cooking and includes a two-story cathedral ceiling, arched windows and French doors to the back yard, granite counters and abundant custom wood cabinets. …

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