Students to Ask Court for Leave to Sue for Breach of Contract

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 30, 2005 | Go to article overview
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Students to Ask Court for Leave to Sue for Breach of Contract


Byline: By Robin Turner Western Mail

A courtroom showdown between Welsh students and the university they claim has let them down is one step closer today.

On Tuesday at Swansea District Court, philosophy students will appear to argue against the University of Wales Swansea for alleged breach of contract.

If they are successful they will be given the go-ahead to proceed with the convention-busting action.

Their law suit follows the suspension of Philosophy lecturer Colwyn Williamson, a critic of plans by the university management to cut academic courses, including Philosophy.

The students believe their education is being hit by Mr Williamson's continued absence from the campus.

Second year Philosophy student Helen Donne said yesterday, 'The students are very serious about this action and intend to pursue it to the end.'

Mr Williamson, a member of the Association of University Teachers, was arrested in February for alleged unauthorised computer access at the campus but he was not charged, receiving a caution by South Wales Police who then dropped all further investigations.

A series of meetings has been held about his position at the university but in the meantime he remains suspended.

An open meeting has also been called for next Tuesday at 1pm at the University's Fulton House, to discuss possible further student action.

Student spokeswoman Louise Stoddart said, 'Due to his exclusion from campus a live video link shall be set up to enable Colwyn Williamson to address the meeting.'

The university issued this statement yesterday, 'The University to date has received no communication from any legal court regarding action by Philosophy students.

'We are particularly puzzled because the University has internal procedures for dealing with student concerns about aspects of their courses.

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Students to Ask Court for Leave to Sue for Breach of Contract
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